Mac Stone Named 2018 Recipient of the Philip Hyde Grant

NANPA Foundation has awarded Mac Stone of Greenville, South Carolina with its 2018 Philip Hyde Grant of $2,500 for his Old Growth: Ancient Swamps of the South project.

Since 1999, the Philip Hyde Grant has been made possible by individual donations to the NANPA Foundation. It is awarded by the NANPA Foundation to a NANPA member who is actively pursuing an environmental project that is consistent with the missions of NANPA and the NANPA Foundation.

Stone’s project focuses on three locations: Corkscrew Swamp in Naples, FL; Congaree National Park near Columbia, SC; and Beidler Forest near Charleston, SC. Although these properties are secure from development, the challenges that they face result from outside forces and the ongoing dissolution and fragmentation of wetland habitat on the periphery that threatens the hydrology, connectivity, ecology and integrity of these landscapes. These old growth swamps are some of the most biodiverse and ecologically rich landscapes of the nation. They exist on the fringes of large cities and yet they are widely unknown. The goal, however, is not to overload the sanctuaries with visitors, but to heighten the profile and increase the appreciation for and understanding of all wetland forests through the compelling narratives found in these ambassadorial swamps. This comes at a critical time when southern states have started to witness firsthand the ecological and social roles that wetlands must be allowed to play, especially after hurricanes Irma, Florence and Michael.

A raccoon emerges from a hollowed Tupelo tree in the Beidler Forest, SC. © Mac Stone

Photography is the delivery vehicle for this entire project. As visual creatures, we use what we see to teach us what we know. If the majority of the public is afraid to physically explore these flooded forests, then it becomes harder to convince them to become advocates for their protection. Photography is the door that most people need to walk through to visit these places for the first time.

Old Growth will use some of the most advanced and creative photographic tools to bring these stories to fruition. Camera traps will document the nocturnal and seldom-seen wildlife that inhabits these bottomland forests. Drones and aerial photography from fixed wing airplanes will help document the context in which the landscapes exist. Canopy surveys of 100-foot tall cypress will also be used to highlight the botanical diversity found in the ancient trees. Underwater photography will reveal the aquatic life that provides the foundation from which the entire system runs. Furthermore, photography will play the main role in creating breakthroughs in science that this project will reveal.

© Mac Stone

The grant will help finish the fieldwork gathering photography and information that will be complied into a coffee-table book, expected to be published in November 2020, followed by a traveling exhibit throughout the southern area of the United States.

A yellow bellied slider and American alligator soak up the sun on a submerged log in the Francis Beidler Forest, South Carolina. © Mac Stone

This grant was named for Philip J. Hyde who was the primary conservation photographer for the Sierra Club and became known for his color images of Western landscapes that became a weapon against environmental degradation.  Photographers receiving the grant are following in his footsteps of environmental protection through photography.

The NANPA Foundation initiates, partners, operates, and generates funding for projects that advance the awareness and appreciation of nature through photography.  For information about the NANPA Foundation, visit its website at www.nanpafoundation.org.

Jake Brown Homovich is 2018 Janie Moore Greene Grant Recipient

Jake Brown Homovich of Downsville, New York has been chosen as the 2018 Janie Moore Greene Grant recipient. He is beginning his graduate program studies in photography at the Maine Salt Institute for Documentary Studies at the Maine College of Art.

Remote Village in Western Sichuan, China © Jake Brown Homovich

Following graduation from his undergraduate studies, Homovich moved to Chengdu, China to hone his artistic ability as a photographer. He is documenting the minority populations of China, particularly the Qiang, Hui and Tibetan people, and how the rapid growth of tourism within China has affected their culture, geography, religion and ways of life.

The Janie Moore Greene Grant is a $1,000 award given annually by the NANPA Foundation through the generosity of Janie Moore Greene to a student currently enrolled in, or who has been accepted to, an institution of higher education specializing in the study of photography.

Applications for the 2019 award will be accepted beginning in late summer. For more information and updates, visit the NANPA Foundation website.

Morgan Heim Becomes the 19th Recipient of the Philip Hyde Grant

Morgan Heim of Astoria, Oregon has been awarded the 2017 Philip Hyde Grant by the NANPA Foundation for her work on Trespass, a photographic project that illuminates the environmental impacts of trespass marijuana operations on California’s public lands. Trespass marijuana grows are illegal cultivation of marijuana on public land, usually a national forest, park, wilderness area or sacred tribal lands and are happening in thousands of sites throughout California. Aside from the drug war implications, these trespass sites’ large quantities of pesticides and rodenticides on crops and camps are causing an epidemic of wildlife poisonings, clear-cuts, water theft and pollution.

© Morgan Heim

The Philip Hyde Grant will enable Heim to camera-trap unreclaimed grow sites where wildlife rummage through the refuse of an eradicated grow and are at great risk for poisoning. Heim’s four years’ worth of work on the project has so far resulted in magazine articles, short films and a media library about the trespass grows and their impact on the environment. She intends to create gallery exhibit kits for her and her partners to distribute to create guerilla-style marketing campaigns about the environmental issues associated with the trespass grows. Photography is a key component to all of this education about the growing problem.

© Morgan Heim

Since 1999, the Philip Hyde Grant has been made possible by individual donations to the NANPA Foundation. It is awarded by the NANPA Foundation to a NANPA member who is actively pursuing a peer-reviewed environmental project that is consistent with the missions of NANPA and the NANPA Foundation.

©Morgan Heim

This grant was named for Philip J. Hyde who was the primary conservation photographer for the Sierra Club and became known for his color images of Western landscapes that became a weapon against environmental degradation.  Photographers receiving the grant are following in his footsteps of environmental protection through photography.

The NANPA Foundation initiates, partners, operates, and generates funding for projects that advance the awareness and appreciation of nature through photography.  For information about the NANPA Foundation, visit its website at www.nanpafoundation.org.

Kelsey Gramza is Awarded the 2017 Janie Moore Greene Grant

Kelsey Gramza of West Falls, New York has been chosen as the 2017 Janie Moore Greene Grant recipient. She is in her sophomore year at University at Buffalo and is pursuing a Bachelor’s of Fine Arts degree with a concentration in photography. University at Buffalo is in Buffalo, New York.

© Kelsey Gramza, 2017 Janie Moore Greene Grant Recipient

Gramza’s career goals are to go on to graduate school and become a photography professor at a university. She currently runs a photography club at University at Buffalo.

© Kelsey Gramza, 2017 Janie Moore Greene Grant Recipient

Gramza shared what has led up to her studying photography which started when she was eight years old and picked up a camera for the first time. Her father commended her on her first photographs and she hasn’t looked back since. In 2013, she was awarded a NANPA High School Scholarship Program scholarship which allowed her to attend NANPA’s 2013 Nature Photography Summit and Trade Show in Jacksonville, Florida. Gramza described that experience as “one of the most inspiring weeks of my life. I learned more from that experience than I ever had about photography and I connected with so many others in my group. To this day, I still keep in contact with and watch those in the program with me grow in their photography.”

© Kelsey Gramza, 2017 Janie Moore Greene Grant Recipient

The Janie Moore Greene Grant is a $1,000 award given annually by the NANPA Foundation through the generosity of Janie Moore Greene to a student currently enrolled in, or who has been accepted to, an institution of higher education specializing in the study of photography.

Applications for the 2018 award will be accepted beginning in late summer. For more information and updates, visit the NANPA Foundation website.

NANPA Foundation Announces Krista Schlyer as 2016 Recipient of Philip Hyde Grant

Award Highlights Use of Photography in Conservation Efforts

Anacostia 11-19-15-3001

The NANPA Foundation is pleased to announce that Krista Schlyer of Mount Rainier, Maryland is the recipient of the 2016 Philip Hyde Grant for her work using photography and visual storytelling to draw attention to one of the United States’ most denuded river ecosystems: the Anacostia River. This $2,500 peer-reviewed grant is awarded annually by the NANPA Foundation to a nature photographer who is actively pursuing completion of an environmental project.

The award will help continue Schlyer’s project which is to create a thorough documentation of the river from its deep biodiversity to the connection of people to this river system, as well as the past and ongoing threats to the river’s health and the solutions that promise a better future. Her documentation of the deforestation, agricultural and urban runoff, and toxic industry which has caused the deterioration of the river’s ecosystem began six years ago. The grant allows her to continue her work which will culminate in August 2018 with a photography/coffee table book, oral history, film, outdoor traveling exhibit and slideshow presentation.

North American beaver (Castor canadensis) on the Anacostia River, Washington DC metro region. USA. July 2014. Cropped

North American beaver (Castor canadensis) on the Anacostia River, Washington DC metro region. USA. July 2014.

Since 1999, the Philip Hyde Grant has been made possible by individual donations to the NANPA Foundation. It is awarded by the NANPA Foundation to a NANPA member who is actively pursuing a peer-reviewed environmental project that is consistent with the missions of NANPA and the NANPA Foundation.

Trash and other pollution in the Anacostia River watershed. Photo taken in the US Arboretum.

Trash and other pollution in the Anacostia River watershed. Photo taken in the US Arboretum.

This grant was named for Philip J. Hyde who was the primary conservation photographer for the Sierra Club and became known for his color images of Western landscapes that became a weapon against environmental degradation.  Photographers receiving the grant are following in his footsteps of environmental protection through photography.

The NANPA Foundation initiates, partners, operates, and generates funding for projects that advance the awareness and appreciation of nature through photography.  For information about the NANPA Foundation, visit its website at www.nanpafoundation.org.

 

Applications for the 2017 award will be accepted beginning in late summer. For more information and updates, visit the NANPA Foundation website.

Great blue heron on the Anacostia River.

Great blue heron on the Anacostia River.

2016 Janie Moore Greene Grant is Awarded to Jiayu Su

Award recognizes those studying photography in higher education.

landscape-1_1
Image © Jiayu Su

Jiayu Su of Powell, Wyoming has been named the 2016 Janie Moore Greene Grant recipient. He is a first-year student pursuing an Associate of Applied Science degree in Photographic Communications at Northwest College in Powell, Wyoming.

Su described the events that have led him to study photography:

“Around five years ago, I was invited to visit a small valley in a poor area in China. I had never been interested in photography until I took a picture of a little girl, who was looking at me with a bright and shining eyes. That picture touched me so much. I found out what a magical power of the photos which can change people’s heart or perspective. Then, I started to devote in taking photos.

I have never thought about photography would be my future job before I came to college. I studied communication before and I considered photography would just be my hobby. I never thought it would be my career, but after I have seen some of the images of the Yellowstone National Park which have been taken by the students in my college, I changed my mind, and also changed my major. I love nature photography so much, no matter if it is landscape or wildlife. I want to study photography and I want to be a professional photographer.

animal-2_1
Image © Jiayu Su

I want to gain some professional experience during my two years in the college. And I am going to be a nature photographer so that I can record the changing of our beautiful natures in the world and provide my photos to some magazines or organizations like NANPA so that people would pay more attention to our environment.”

The Janie Moore Greene Grant is a $1,000 award given annually by the NANPA Foundation through the generosity of Janie Moore Greene to a student currently enrolled in, or who has been accepted to, an institution of higher education specializing in the study of photography.

Applications for the 2017 award will be accepted beginning in late summer. For more information and updates, visit the NANPA Foundation website.

 

Michelle A. Butler Chosen as 2015 Janie Moore Greene Grant Recipient

Award recognizes those studying photography in higher education.

Image © Michelle A. Butler

Image © Michelle A. Butler

Michelle A. Butler of Middletown, Delaware, has been chosen as the recipient of the 2015 Janie Moore Greene Scholarship Grant. She is completing her master’s of fine arts degree from the Academy of Art University, San Francisco.

Ms. Butler is working on a photo-documentary thesis project to raise awareness about the condition of birds in the Americas. It highlights the habitats needed for nesting, wintering and migration and calls for conservation efforts that citizens can make to help protect these essential components to our ecosystem.

Photo © Michelle A. Butler.

Photo © Michelle A. Butler.

The Janie Moore Greene Grant is a $1,000 award given annually by the NANPA Foundation through the generosity of Janie Moore Greene to a student currently enrolled in, or who has been accepted to, an institution of higher education specializing in the study of photography.

Applications for the 2016 award will be accepted beginning in late summer. For more information and updates, visit the NANPA Foundation website.

NANPA Foundation Announces 2015 Recipient of the Philip Hyde Environmental Grant

Award highlights use of photography in conservation efforts.

Slough Creek Road at Sunrise, Mississippi River Basin, Wyoming, 2008. Image © Alison M. Jones for No Water No Life

Slough Creek Road at Sunrise, Mississippi River Basin, Wyoming, 2008.
Image © Alison M. Jones for No Water No Life

The NANPA Foundation is pleased to announce that Alison M. Jones of New York City, New York is the recipient of the 2015 Philip Hyde Environmental Grant for her work illustrating current threats to freshwater systems and proposing sound management policies and solutions to six chosen watersheds in North America and Northeastern Africa.  This $2,500 peer-reviewed grant is awarded annually to an individual member of the North American Nature Photography Association (NANPA) who is actively pursuing completion of an environmental project.

Autumn foliage of Barberry (an invasive species), Upper Raritan River Basin, New Jersey, 2012. Image © Alison M. Jones for No Water No Life

Autumn foliage of Barberry (an invasive species), Upper Raritan River Basin, New Jersey, 2012.
Image © Alison M. Jones for No Water No Life

Ms. Jones’s project will focus on the translation of interviews with local stakeholders during the more than 30 photographic expeditions that have been conducted to the six watershed locations. The project’s main goal is to raise awareness of the vital importance of freshwater resources, the perils of watershed degradation, and opportunities for sustainable resource management. More information on Ms. Jones and the project is available at www.nowater-nolife.org.

Slough Creek Road at Sunrise, Mississippi River Basin, Wyoming, 2008. Image © Alison M. Jones for No Water No Life

Slough Creek Road at Sunrise, Mississippi River Basin, Wyoming, 2008.
Image © Alison M. Jones for No Water No Life

Since 1999, the Philip Hyde Environmental Grant has been made possible by individual donations to the NANPA Foundation. It is awarded by the NANPA Foundation to a NANPA member who is actively pursuing a peer-reviewed environmental project that is consistent with the missions of NANPA and the NANPA Foundation.

This grant was named for Philip J. Hyde who was the primary conservation photographer for the Sierra Club and became known for his color images of Western landscapes that became a weapon against environmental degradation.  Photographers receiving the grant are following in his footsteps of environmental protection through photography.

The NANPA Foundation develops, supports and implements nature photography projects jointly with the North American Nature Photography Association and other organizations.  It initiates, partners, operates, and generates funding for projects that advance awareness of and appreciation for nature through photography.  For information about the NANPA Foundation, visit its website at www.nanpafoundation.org.  For information about NANPA, visit www.nanpa.org.

Crowdfunding Campaign for High School Program Successful

Nearly 100 donors contribute to the campaign.

NANPA Foundation High School Scholarship Program

NANPA Foundation’s first crowdfunding campaign was successful raising more than the $10,000 goal to pay for the 2016 NANPA High School Scholarship Program in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. Thanks to all of our donors who are helping create a life-changing experience for 10 high school students in July 2016.

Karine Aigner
Lisa Auerbach
Richard Beldegreen
Clay Bolt
Myer Bornstein
Jeffrey Botkin
Steve Carter
Don Carter
Stefan Christmann
Carl M. Claus
Emily Cook
Susan Cooper
Dan & Tanya Cox
Deanne Cunningham
Jorel Cuomo
Jamie K. Davidson
Richard & Susan Day
David DesRochers
Kathleen DiTanna
James Doyle
Thomas M. Dwyer
John Eppler
Gary Farber/Hunt’s Photo & Video
Sean Fitzgerald
Dick Forehand
David Francis
Francis J Gallagher
Charles Gangas
Mary Jane Gibson
Arun Kumar Choonatt Gopalakurup
John F. Graham
Colin Haase
Dietmar K. Haenchen
Bruce K. Haley
Teresa Hastings
Arne Hatlestad
David Hattori
Morgan Heim
Ann Marie Heller
Don Henderson
James Heupel
Cindy Miller Hopkins
Ruth Hoyt
C. F. Burgess, III
Margaret E. Johnson
Thomas Kachelmeyer
Lewis Kemper
Mark R. Kreider
Alexander Kumar
Don Kurz
Jeri L Love
Michele Lowell
Abigail McBride
Daniel M. Mele
Teofilo Moreno
John J. Mullin
Louis F. Nettelhorst
John & Shirley Nuhn
Theodore Orwig
Robert J. Oswald
Panasonic Lumix
Cynthia Parnell
Dee Ann Pederson
Cheryl G. Pelavin
Sujinder Pothula
Teresa Ransdell
Sheila Reeves
Alice L. Robertson
Ronald S. Rosenstock
Gabrielle Salazar
Richard Sherman
Harvey Spears
Mac Stone
Roy Toft
William Tompkins
Strabo Tours
Rudyard Uzzell
Greg Vaughn
Sonia Wasco
Lindsey Wasson
Debra Waters
Harold Watson
Michele Westmorland
Charles Whiting
Linda Williams
W. K. Wilson
John R. Yuccas
Anonymous (11)

Environmental Grant Supports Projects with Impact

Philip Hyde Environmental Grant applications accepted through October 30, 2015.

Blazing orange Tennessee shiners and yellow striped saffron shiners densely pack in around a stoneroller on a rock nest in a small Smoky Mountain National Park river. Image © David Herasimtschuk, 2014 Philip Hyde Environmental Grant recipient.

What difference do your photographs make?

Applications are now available for NANPA’s Philip Hyde Environmental Grant, a $2,500 award given annually to an individual NANPA member actively pursuing completion of a peer-reviewed environmental project featuring natural photography as a medium of communication, nature appreciation and environmental protection. Application deadline is October 30, 2015 at midnight PDT.

Past recipients include Paul Colangelo (2010), whose efforts to bring the remote and largely unseen Sacred Headwaters of British Columbia to the attention of lawmakers and citizens outside of the Tahltan First Nation played a key role in vacating Shell Oil Company from a million acres slated for methane development; Amy Gulick (2008), whose award-winning book Salmon in the Trees, traveling exhibits, lectures and YouTube videos tell a hopeful story of Alaska’s Tongass rain forest, a rare ecosystem where salmon grow trees and support an abundance of bears and bald eagles; and C.C. Lockwood (2008), whose photographs showcase disappearing swamplands that threatened the culture and economy of Louisiana, as featured in the PBS documentary Atchafalaya Houseboat.

As applicants for the Philip Hyde Environmental Grant, these photographers successfully demonstrated the ways in which their still photographs would make a difference to specific decision-makers wrestling with a timely issue. Additionally, at the time of application, these projects were already well underway, with established collaborations, realistic schedules and practical budgets. These factors made for compelling applications that fared well in scoring.

Click here for complete guidelines, a link to the online application and additional tips for applicants.

The inaugural Philip Hyde Environmental Grant was awarded in 1999. It was established in honor of Philip Hyde, recipient of NANPA’s 1996 Lifetime Achievement Award.

Although he studied under Ansel Adams, Minor White and Edward Weston, Hyde describes his work as evolving past the hard and fast definitions of his early training. “I am not interested in pretty pictures for postcards. I feel better if I just get a few people to see something they haven’t seen before,” writes Hyde.

The Philip Hyde Environmental Grant honors this spirit, supporting photographers who clearly document in application materials the ways in which their projects reach influential people—not necessarily the mass public—and challenge them to discover something new about an imminent environmental issue.

Hyde, whose photograph “Cathedral in the Desert, Glen Canyon, Utah, 1964” was named one of the top 100 photographs of the 20th Century by American Photo magazine, played a key role in protecting Dinosaur National Monument, the Grand Canyon, the Coast Redwoods, Point Reyes, King’s Canyon, Canyon de Chelly, the North Cascades, Canyonlands, the Wind Rivers, Big Sur and many other National Parks and wilderness areas.